1.Finger big finger

Gout is the most common foot condition. It is a complex deformity of the first joint (metatarsophalangeal) of the big toe. This deformation creates a flexion (outward deviation) and rotation of the big toe, in relation to its axis. Specifically, in the inner part of this joint, a protrusion (good) is created.

This protrusion is often inflamed, red and swollen. It is often painful and is often accompanied by difficulty walking and footwear problems. The situation is aggravated by the fact that this area receives a lot of friction from the shoes.

The natural course of the disease is the deviation of the big toe to the second or even third finger, which are deformed by hammering, hamstringing or riding on the big toe, as well as by calluses on these fingers.

Operations are often performed as day surgeries, and the patient may return home the same day.

2. Stiff big toe

The stiff big toe is a degenerative arthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal (MTF) joint that creates a large dorsal osteophyte and therefore we have stiffness with mainly reduction of the dorsal area of the big toe and severe pain. The disease can be degenerative and general.

- Systemic osteoarthritis
- Traumatic arthritis (chronic injury) which is common in soccer players and ballet dancers.
- Inflammatory conditions (rheumatoid arthritis)
- Metabolic disorders (gout, etc.)

Operations are often performed as day surgeries, and the patient may return home the same day.

3. Hammer Finger / Fingerprint.


The first phalangeal joint is in flexion, while the second in extension, resulting in the development of good on the dorsal surface of the first phalangeal joint by the pressure of the shoe.

Operations are often performed as day surgeries, and the patient may return home the same day.

4. Morton neuroma

It is due to compression perineural fibrosis of the common finger nerve of the third interdigital fissure, which is the most common. However it can grow in any interdigital space.

It is common in road, jump and team athletes due to injury or chronic stress. Also, tight, inappropriate shoes or in combination with subcutaneous fat atrophy can cause the disease. The symptoms are metatarsalgia with localized pain in the heads of the metatarsals and intense burning pain, with a feeling of tightness or cramping. The confirmation of the disease is done by magnetic. Conservative treatment consists of special orthotics and shoes, topical steroids in combination with local anesthetics.

Surgery can be done by decompressing the neuroma or surgically removing it. Surgeries are often performed as day surgeries, and the patient may return home the same day.